From the news desk

Cape could face water shortage next summer

Share this article
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Western Cape government on Friday said it was of great concern that below average rainfall was predicted for the coming winter and could mean that water restrictions would be extended.

Anton Bredell, the provincial minister for local government, environmental affairs and development planning, noted that dam levels were already a third lower than usual.

“With our primary dam levels on average 30 percent lower than this time last year, the rainfall predictions are not ideal. If the drought persists, the availability of water in the next summer season is of some concern,” he said.

Bredell said the Western Cape Disaster Management Centre was recommending during the rainy season, that water restrictions continue to be implemented across the province where needed, until dam levels had increased to acceptable levels.

Colin Deiner, the head of disaster management, said however that there was currently no immediate need to declare a provincial state of disaster as the largest part of the province was still able to manage their water shortage situation.

“Nevertheless, we remain hard at work updating our preparedness plans in the event of an escalation with regards to water challenges.”

On Monday, the Cape Town council said the levels of the six dams that supplied the city stood at 32.8 percent, down from 34.1 percent on the previous week. The Voëlvlei Dam is only about three metres deep now, at 20 percent full.

Five other provinces have been declared disaster areas due the severe drought afflicting the country. Water restrictions are in place in Cape Town.

[Source: African News Agency]
Share this article
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
Wait a sec, saving restore vars.