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Slave Route Challenge honours 8000 South Africans

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On Sunday, thousands of runners participated in the much anticipated Metropolitan Slave Route Challenge. The Slave Route Challenge is an event that honours South Africa’s heritage. Each registered participant runs in honour of one of the 8000 men, women, and children who are symbolic to South Africa’s history. The 8000 names are listed on the Column of Memory at the Iziko Slave Lodge.

Event PR manager Fatima Allie says over 9000 participants participated in the race yesterday and entries had exceeded the anticipated capacity. The race had to accommodate an extra 1000 participants making it bigger and better than previous years. Allie says the organizing team was saddened to turn people away as the race could hold no more entrants. The event has grown in stature as Capetonians see the race as a tribute to the trials of dispossessed individuals who contributed significantly to the development of Cape Town and South Africa.

The race took runners past several historically significant landmarks, such as the Castle of Good Hope, Grand Parade, the Whipping Post, Old Slave Church, the Iziko Slave Lodge and the Slave Tree Plaque. This event is presented by the Itheko Sport Athletic Club under the auspices of Western Province Athletics. The Slave Route Challenge is sponsored by Metropolitan, as part of its Mojo Series which celebrates the community.

 

 

Runners began the race early Sunday morning. Image source: Metropolitan
Runners began the race early Sunday morning.
Image source: Metropolitan

Participants could choose between various distances; 21.1km, 10k, 5km Fun Run, and a 10km Big Walk.

Siboniso Soldaka won the Mens 10km. Photo: Sharief Jaffer
Siboniso Soldaka won the men’s 10km.
Photo: Sharief Jaffer
Michelle Dreyer won the womens 21km. Photo: Sharief Jaffer ImageSA
Michelle Dreyer won the womens 21km.
Photo: Sharief Jaffer

Runners ventured past numerous historic monuments that are symbolic of South Africa’s slave history, including; the Grand Parade, the Whipping Post, Old Slave Church, the Slave Lodge, and the Slave Tree Plaque.

Runners ventured through historic streets in Cape Town. Photo credit: Nonhlanhla Tseko
Runners ventured through historic streets in Cape Town.
Photo credit: Nonhlanhla Tseko

In addition, participants ran through the iconic Cape Town Castle, District Six, and Bo’Kaap.

Participants were handed fresh koeksisters as they made their way up Koeksister Hill. Images source: Itheko Club
Participants were handed fresh koeksisters as they made their way up Koeksister Hill.
Images source: Itheko Running Club
Image source: Metropolitan Participants were handed fresh koeksisters as they made their way up Koeksister Hill.
Image source: Metropolitan

Medals were handed to each registered participant. In race tradition, a prize giving was hosted following the cut-off time.

Runners gleefully flaunt their medals. Photo credit: Shahied Mustapha
Runners gleefully flaunt their medals.
Photo credit: Shahied Mustapha
Photo credit: Nonhlanhla Tseko
Photo credit: Nonhlanhla Tseko

 


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1 comment

  1. When will the original owners of South Africa be recognised. This is not a call to ethnic chauvinism. On the contrary, the original genocide remains an untold story in post-Apartheid South Africa. Descendants of the Khoi and San peoples were too black under Apartheid and not black enough in post Apartheid South Africa.

    Running for the slaves is symbolic. Recognising the descendants of slaves is another. From the Cape all along the road to Bredasdorp and beyond are stoies written in blood. Can the Khoisan speak?

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