From the news desk

Slight decline in dam levels in the Western Cape

Share this article
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Western Cape has seen a decrease in dam levels for the first time since the winter season.

Provincial spokesperson James-Brent Steyn said current figures revealed the average dam levels are currently standing at 65.7%. Last year, the Gamka Dam, which is the Karoo’s main water source, was bone dry and currently only stands at below 20%.

He said they are concerned about the Karoo where water levels have dropped to below 20%.

“We also see that the City of Cape Town is a bit better than the average for the province with the average dam levels standing at 75.2%. Major dams in the province are much better off than last year at this time. We see the Theewaterskloof dam above 58% full; that’s the biggest dam in the province. Earlier this year, that dam was standing below 6%,” said Steyn.

Addressing the Western Cape-Bavaria Regional Co-operation Seminar in Stellenbosch yesterday, Local Government, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning MEC Anton Bredall said water scarcity remains one of the most important challenges facing the Western Cape.

“The Western Cape Government has identified water and climate changes as provincial risks. The province has been implementing mitigation action, including tasks like clearing alien vegetation, the treating of water waste and ensuring additional bulk water works, but more needs to be done,” Bredall said.

The seminar dealt with environmental technologies in the water sector, with a focus on information sharing between stakeholders.


Share this article
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
Wait a sec, saving restore vars.